Monday, January 14, 2013

Morning Six Pack: January 14, 2013

If you’re drinking all day, why not get started early with these six college football stories from around the country.

Casey Pachall back at TCU

Three months after leaving TCU to take care of personal issues that nearly derailed a promising collegiate career, Casey Pachall has finally made his long-rumored return.

NCAA to discuss specifics one on one in Hurricanes investigation

The nearly 2-year-old NCAA investigation into Miami's compliance practices may be nearing an end. The NCAA is scheduling meetings to discuss specific allegations with individuals who are believed to have committed violations found during the inquiry.

Brandon King's decision is final; JUCO safety will play 'Star' position for Auburn

King, a first-team All-Conference pick at safety for Highlands Community College, says his recruiting process is over after deciding to come to Auburn to play the hybrid safety/linebacker role in Ellis Johnson's 4-2-5 base defense.

Texas DT Moore skipping senior season for NFL

Texas defensive tackle Brandon Moore is skipping his senior year to enter the NFL Draft.

Virginia again fills hole on coaching staff

On the third day of the new year , Virginia sent out a press release announcing that Jeff Banks was one of four assistants hired by Mike London, charged with taking over the Cavaliers special teams.


For Alabama the stigma of hatred, violence and racism would abide. As Crimson Tide football remained at the forefront of the sport as well as inescapably all-white, it carried that stigma as well. Even worse, efforts to integrate the team were hobbled by the anti-integration stance of state officials. It would not be until Sept. 12, 1971 that a black athlete would don the crimson and white to represent Alabama in a regular-season varsity football game, one of the very last teams in college football to do so.

Which leads me to a personal note. As a fan of Alabama football I firmly believe that it is my responsibility to grapple with this difficult aspect of the program's history. As much as I take a certain amount of pride in those trophies and titles earned by the players on the gridiron, I am also required to insure the difficult episodes of Crimson Tide history are preserved as well. And none are more important than integration.

For the past year or so, I have been working with historian Andrew Doyle of Winthrop University on a project examining the integration of the University of Alabama athletics. We firmly believe that the football program was not transformed by a single game, or a single person or any pat cause that fits a simple narrative. Instead it was a long difficult ordeal marked by advances and setbacks that took place in the context of the civil rights movement.

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