Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Bama’s newest holiday tradition: Shooting down Saban rumors

Bama's newest holiday tradition: Shooting down Saban rumors
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By Jess Nicholas, Editor-In-Chief Dec. 11, 2012  

If Saban says he’s staying at Alabama, some fans won’t believe it, because some media won’t let them believe it. This is the perfect story for a writer, site, television network or other entity who is trying to drive interest to his, her or its publication. It writes itself, it plays off fears of abandonment, and no matter what Saban says, it rewrites itself tomorrow.

As such, this writer hopes Saban doesn’t address it. What’s the point? If Nick Saban were to leave Alabama at this point, it wouldn’t be because of money or concern over his job. It would be because he wanted to, because his heart of hearts was elsewhere, either in a specific geographic location or in the pursuit of a challenge yet unattempted. There is no amount of money, begging, praying or fretting that would dissuade Saban from choosing such a path.

And, he doesn’t need to wallow in the mud with those media outlets who thrive on such drama. Not all reporters are in this group, not even a majority. But the steady march of mainstream media down the path first blazed by the National Enquirer and similar publications is a regrettable one, and Saban shouldn’t feel obligated to pick up an instrument and play in that band.
Mash here.

Jess nails it here. Nick Saban is in a no-win scenario, and it's one of his own making. He can't dispel the rumors because of the ill-fated comment he made to the south Florida media six years ago this month. Nor can he confirm his possible interest in taking another shot at success at football's highest level of competition because he's in the midst of preparing his program for a history-making repeat as BCS Champions. The distraction created by such "clutter" would be enormous.

Furthermore, any word out of his mouth simply resets the vicious circle of media spin and muckraking.

The Boston Globe story and the media firestorm that ensued is sensationalist journalism at its worst. It's akin to asking a public figure "when did you stop beating your wife?" It's a question that has no right answer and simply should be met with the death stare. That's exactly what to expect when Saban addresses the media following Alabama's first BCS Championship preparation next Tuesday.

Until then, it's that time of year again.