Monday, July 12, 2010

El Presidente's Deepwater Horizon commission doesn't know its job

The regime's Deepwater Horizon Commission--you know, the commission that doesn't have any safety experts or engineers on it--didn't even know that its primary role was to investigate the causes of the Deepwater Horizon blowout, explosion and fire that killed 11 men and began the nation's worst oil spill, and that the commissions findings would have a direct impact on the regime's decision on the fate of the off-again, on-again deepwater drilling moratorium.

In fact, it was all the way into the afternoon session of its very first meeting before U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, D-LA, read a portion of Secretariat Salazarovich's statement identifying the commission's findings as one of the factors the regime would consider:

The commission learned about its role in finding safe ways to restore drilling from U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, who made an unscheduled appearance before the new panel in New Orleans on Monday.

She read a statement from Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, which stated that the information collected by the commission would be among three items the Obama administration would consider in determining what kinds of new drilling would be allowed.

That surprised commission co-Chairman William Reilly, who said his panel wouldn't have the responsibility to recommend "near-term policy" and reiterated that last week a top Interior official informed him the administration would fight for a moratorium regardless of what the commission recommended.

Pathetic, isn't it?  But the panel's ignorance explains the curious "site visits" junkets the panel members had been on since arriving on the Gulf Coast late last week, in which they met with local community leaders to hear about the spill's impact, but not the causes.  I thought it odd when I read it, but it never occurred to me that they weren't asking "cause" questions because they didn't know that's what they were supposed to be doing.

This is not exactly an isolated incident, either.  Late last month, the administrator of the $20 billion slush fund set up by BP didn't exactly know who was covered under the deal or who wasn't. 

It's really not the commission's fault that they don't know their jobs.  Nor is it Ken Feinberg's fault that he doesn't know what his fund covers.  It's the fault of the White House, which hasn't had a clue about its job since the day the regime took over.

When do the grownups come back?

Gimme some feedback in the comments.